The Villager Story in Coral Gables

Article Published October 2016

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villager-articalASK ANY TENTATIVE GYM-GOER FOR THEIR perfect exercise scenario and it might go a little something like this: Show up to a clean and well-equipped space with no other people in sight and an encouraging and knowledgeable personal trainer who will determine the exact exercises that are most beneficial to their specific needs… all in under half an hour.

Sound like a dream? It’s not. Founded in Europe more than a decade ago, Concept 10 10 is now offering its private personal training services to South Floridians, with locations in Naples and now Coral Gables. Focusing on quality equipment and efficient routines, Concept 10 10 continues to draw fans (and potential franchisees) from around the globe.

 

 

 

Concept 10 10 Comes to Coral Gables

Personal trainer Megan Barnes demonstrates the equipment that focuses on lower back strengthening.

Personal trainer Megan Barnes demonstrates the equipment that focuses on lower back strengthening.

While many exercise-conscious people spend time every day at the gym, squeezed in between work and their personal routine, a new concept offers better results with just 20 minutes a week.

Concept 10 10 recently opened its first location in South Florida in Coral Gables and offers one-on-one sessions with a personal trainer and special strength-building equipment.

The program is designed to have more effective but less frequent sessions. The program also is designed to target the lumbar muscles to strengthen them to reduce lower back pain.

Megan Barnes, one of the personal trainers at the Coral Gables location, explained the principle behind the program.

“What we do here is very unique hi-intensity training that focuses on a full body workout and strength training,” said Barnes. “With back pain that’s one of the reasons that we get a lot of members. We work with doctors and chiropractors all over the world and all of our equipment is scientifically based to adjust to our strength curve.

Read the rest of the story in Miami’s Community Papers – Click Here

Personal Trainer Kathy Dominguez – Naples

Kathy has been with Concept 10 10 in Naples since the start in 2008.

She is very well liked among her many clients and she has also gained great results from her own weekly workout.

She is currently pregnant and is convinced that Concept 10 10 has made a huge positive difference in the process.

Personal Fitness Trainer Megan Barnes – Miami

Megan is originally from Pittsburg but now lives in Miami where she attends university.

She completed her certification as a Concept 10 10 instructor some time ago and now works at the Miami branch.

She is very knowledgeable and has a very likeable personality.

Overview: Perspective and Importance in the Future of Strength Training in the Field of Rehabilitation

Vert Mooney, M.D., San Diego
Professor of Orthopaedics UCSD, Medical Director Orthomed Center, San Diego

It is now recognized that chronicity of musculoskeletal pain is associated with inhibited motor function and a phenomenon called „deconditioning“. Under these conditions reoccurrence of pain inducing episodes with the usual life event of the „unguarded moment“ can be expected. Significant sudden changes in physical demands, either increased or decreased, are often associated with this phenomenon.

Physical therapy in the form of manual therapy and surface supplied modalities to decrease pain, often offer short-term relief. There is no documentation, however, that these forms of treatment to change the natural course of disease and recurrence. There is no consensus even as to the most effective pain diminishing physical therapy modality. One reason for the lack of consensus is our inability to measure the dose of the therapeutic modality, and objectively measure the results of treatment. On the other hand, resistance training is measurable and the results of training, aside from the subjective statement of diminished pain, are likewise measurable by strength and endurance testing. The use of equipment, however, is necessary to achieve measurement.
In our own studies, recurrence of pain complaint after completion of a strength training program on chronic back pain patients, all which had failed previous physical therapy, was 10 %. This is at 1-year follow-up. Other studies using more passive therapies quote recurrence rates of up to 50%.

The future of this form of treatment, Le. physical training, depends upon transfer of care responsibility to the patient away from the „healer“. This is not easy to accomplish and the duration of training necessary to have the desired insurance. The feasible solution for this dilemma is the medicalization of health clubs. In this environment, musculoskeletal disorders are treated as ailments not diseases, and physical therapy becomes physical training supervised by qualified staff who are comfortable with treatment of musculoskeletal disorders ideally such facilities would have the back up of appropriate medical professionals. Nonetheless, the treatment theme will have to be the pleasure of self-care in a supportive environment of training. A key component of training must be however, feedback of measured performance which requires appropriately designed equipment.

Living Longer Stronger

Eilington Darden, Ph.D., Gainesville

The purpose of the Living Longer Stronger program is to provide middle-aged people with a course at action to rebuild muscle mass. An average adult in the United States , for example, loses one-half pound of muscle per year between the ages of 20 and 50. As a 50-year old, his or her body is 15 pounds less muscular than at age 20.

Rebuilding atrophied, weakened muscle entails proper strength training. Proper strength training requires an understanding of the concepts of exercise intensity, progression, form, duration, frequency, and variation. With correct application of the above concepts, an average adult can add from 3 to 4 pounds of muscle during an initial, six-week, strength-training program. Thereafter, the muscle-building results decrease by approximately 25 percent with each successive six-week training period.

Research shows that the typical 50-year-old man or woman can rebuild 15 pounds of atrophied muscle in 18 months. Accomplishing this feat will help this individual live a stronger, leaner, and more productive life.

The Effect of Weight-Bearing Exercise on Bone Mineral Density: A Study on Female Ex-Athletics and the General Population

Dr. John Ethefington, London
St Thomas Hospital , London

The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to estimate the changes in bone mineral density (BMD) as a consequence of exercise in female ex-athletes and age matched controls. Eighty-three ex-elite female athletes (67 middie and long distance runners, 16 tennis players, currently aged 40-65) were recruited from the original records of their sporting associations. Controls were 585 age matched females. The main outcome measures were BIVID of lumbar spine (LS) femoral neck (FN) and forearm, estimated by DXA scan. Levels of physical activity were assessed using a modified Allied Dunbar Fitness Survey scale and classified as a) Ex-athletes b)

Active controls ( > 1 hour of vigorous physical activity currently and in the past) c) Low activity controls with inconsistent or intermediate levels of activity d) Inactive controls (<15 minutes exercise per week). Results: after adjustment for differences in age, weight, height and smoking, athletes had greater BIVIDs than controls; 8.7% at the LS (95% CI 5.4 – 12.0, p< 0.001) and 12.1% at FN (9.0 – 15.3, p< 0.001). The benefits of exercise appeared to persist after cessation of sporting activity. Active controls (n = 22) had greater BIVIDs than the Inactive group (n = 347) : 7.9% LS (2.0 – 13.8, p = 0.009) and 8.3% FN (2.7 – 13.8, p = 0.004). The Low activity controls (n = 216) had an intermediate BMD. Tennis players had greater BMDs compared to runners; 12.0% LS (5.7 – 18.2 p = 0.0004), 6.5 % FN (- 0.2 – 13.2, p = 0.066). The BIVID of Tennis players’ dominant forearms were greater than their non-dominant forearms. In conclusion, regular vigorous weight bearing exercise of one hour or more per week is associated with an increase in BIVID within a normal population. This study confirms long term weight-bearing exercise as an important factor in the regulation of bone mass and fracture prevention.

Limited Range-of-Motion Lumbar Extension Strength Training

James E. Graves, Michael L. Pollock, Scott H. Leggett, David M. Carpenter, Cecily K. Fix, and Michael N. Fulton

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of limited rangeofmotion (ROM) resistance training on the development of lumbar extension strength through a 72° ROM. 33 men and 25 women (age = 30 ± 11 yr) were randomly assigned to one of three training groups or a control group (C; n = 10) that did not train. Training was conducted once per week for 12 wk and consisted of one set of 8­12 repetitions of variable resistance lumbar extensions until volitional fatigue. Group A (n = 18) trained from 72° to 36° of lumbar flexion; group B (n = 14) from 36° to 0° of lumbar flexion; and group AB (n = 16) from 72° to 0° of lumbar flexion. Prior to and after training, isometric lumbar extension torque was assessed at 72°, 60°, 48°, 36°, 24°, 12°, and 0° of lumbar flexion. Analysis of covariance showed that groups A, B, and AB increased lumbar extension torque (P 0.05) at all angles measured when compared with C. The greatest gains in torque were noted for groups A and B in their respective ranges of training but A and B did not differ from AB (P > 0.05) at any angle. These data indicate that limited ROM lumbar extension training through a 36° ROM is effective for developing strength through 72° of lumbar extension.

High Intensity Strength Training in Nonagenarians

Effects on skeletal muscle

Maria A. Fiatarone, MD; Elizabeth C. Marks, MS; Nancy D. Ryan, DT; Carol N. Meredith, PhD; Lewis A. Lipsitz, MD; William J. Evans, PhD

Muscle dysfunction and associated mobility impairment, common among the frail elderly, increase the risk of falls, fractures, and functional dependency. We sought to characterize the muscle weakness of the very old and its reversibility through strength training. Ten frail, institutionalized volunteers aged 90 ± 1 years undertook 8 weeks of highintensity resistance training. Initially, quadriceps strength was correlated negatively with walking time (r= ­.745). Fatfree mass (r=”.732)” and regional muscle mass (r=”.752)” were correlated positively with muscle strength.

Strength gains averaged 174% + 31% (mean ± SEM) in the 9 subjects who completed training. Midthigh muscle area increased 9.0% ± 4.5%. Mean tandem gait speed improved 48% after training. We conclude that highresistance weight training leads to significant gains in muscle strength, size, and functional mobility among frail residents of nursing homes up to 96 years of age.